Northern Region Stroke Research Projects 

 

Please see below for current and recruiting stroke recovery and rehabilitation studies running in the Northern region. These records are up to date as of 23/04/19. Please contact researchers directly if you would like more information or to take part.

 

 

ASAP: Assessment of Sensation in the Adult Population

Aim

The aim of this study is to test the validity and reliability of several clinical assessments of hand and arm sensation and coordination.

Who

This study is for people aged 18 and older who have experienced a stroke at least 6 months ago, and still have altered sensation in their hand or arm.

What

Sensation and coordination of the arms will be tested by two assessors, in two sessions at least a week apart. Each session lasts approximately 3 hours.

Where

Assessments take place either at the Auckland City Hospital, or at the participant’s home if preferred.

Contact

Harry Jordan, University of Auckland

H.jordan@auckland.ac.nz

021 2056 009

 

 

 

SAFIST: Symmetry and Feedback In STroke

Aim

The aim of this study is to see whether vibration feedback can help people walk more symmetrically after stroke.

Who

This study is for people aged at least 18 who experienced a stroke at least 6 months ago and experience ongoing problems with their walking.
People can take part if they have had any type of stroke, provided it affected only one side of their body, and they can walk for a few minutes at a time.
Using walking sticks and ankle braces is ok, but this study isn’t suitable for people who need to use a walking frame.

What

The first session takes a couple of hours and involves walking for short periods on a treadmill while measurements are made.
Participants might also be asked to participate in further training sessions, to see if the feedback can produce long-term improvements in walking.

Where

This session takes place at the Millennium Institute in Albany, and transport is provided if needed.

Contact

Dr Marie-Claire Smith, University of Auckland

m-c.smith@auckland.ac.nz

021 0232 3351

 

 

 

MAST: Mindfulness training for people after stroke
A feasibility study

Aim

The aim of this study is to see whether mindfulness training can be used by people with stroke to reduce depression and anxiety, and improve their quality of life.

Who

This study is for people aged at least 17 who experienced a stroke between 6 months and 10 years ago, and are now experiencing low mood. 

What

The first session involves completing some questionnaires, which takes around an hour.
Then a therapist meets with participants for one hour each week, for six weeks, for mindfulness training.
At the end of that period, participants take part in an interview and complete another set of questionnaires.
This is followed four weeks later by a top-up mindfulness session and a final set of questionnaires.

Where

In the participant’s home, in the Auckland area

Contact

Dr Jill Wrapson, Auckland University of Technology

jill.wrapson@aut.ac.nz

09 921 9999 Extension 7421

 

 

 

TWIST: Time to Walking Independently after Stroke

Aim

The aim of the study is to validate an algorithm for predicting whether and when a person will be able to walk independently again after stroke.

Who

This study is for people with stroke admitted to Auckland, North Shore, and Waitakere Hospitals, who are having difficulty walking.
The study is appropriate for people aged at least 18, who were walking independently before the stroke, and participation begins within the first week after stroke.
People can take part if they have any type of stroke, provided it affects only one side of the body. They can also take part if they have a previous stroke.

What

The effects of the stroke on the movement areas of the brain are also assessed using non-invasive stimulation and an MRI scan within a week after stroke.
Strength and movement of the legs is evaluated using simple clinical assessments within a week after stroke, and again 3 and 6 months after stroke.
Phone calls are also made between these assessments, to see how well the person is walking.

Where

Assessments take place at Auckland Hospital while the person is an inpatient, with brief follow-up phone calls every couple of weeks once the person has been discharged.
The follow-up assessments at 3 and 6 months after stroke take place at home or at Auckland Hospital, and transport is provided if needed.

Contact

Dr Marie-Claire Smith, University of Auckland

m-c.smith@auckland.ac.nz

021 0232 3351

 

 

 

PROMISE: Proportional Recovery of Movement and Sensation after Stroke

Aim

The aim of this study is to evaluate the recovery of sensation and movement in the hand and arm after stroke.

Who

This study is for people with stroke admitted to Auckland Hospital, with sensory loss in their hand or arm.

The study is suitable for people aged at least 18, and participation begins within the first week after stroke.
People can take part if they have any type of stroke, provided it affects only one side of the body.

What

Sensation and movement of the hand and arm are assessed weekly to fortnightly while you are recovering, and at 3 and 6 months after stroke.
The assessments take up to a couple of hours, and involve testing sensitivity to light touch, the ability to detect the position of the wrist and fingers, and the ability to make simple movements.

The effects of the stroke on the sensory and movement areas of the brain are also assessed using non-invasive stimulation and an MRI scan.

Where

Assessments take place at Auckland Hospital while the person is an inpatient, and at their home once they are discharged.
The assessments at 3 and 6 months after stroke take place at the Hospital, and transport is provided if needed.

Contact

Benjamin Chong, University of Auckland

Ben.chong@auckland.ac.nz

021 081 67971

 

 

 

RELIEF: Clinical feasibility, usability, and acceptance of the Re-Link Gait Trainer in sub-acute stroke rehabilitation

Aim

The aim of this study is to see whether it is feasible to use the Re-Link Gait Trainer during rehabilitation for walking after stroke.

Who

This study is for people aged at least 18 who experienced a stroke within the last month and experience ongoing problems with their walking.
People can take part if they have had any type of stroke, provided it affected only one side of their body, and they can stand with assistance if needed.

What

Taking part involves trying the Re-Link Trainer and giving feedback about it to the therapists.
Leg strength and walking ability will also be assessed, during rehabilitation, and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after stroke.

Where

The study will take place at Auckland Hospital while people are in rehabilitation.
Follow-up assessments will take place at the Newmarket Campus of the University of Auckland. Transport will be provided if needed.

Contact

Claire Valentine, Auckland DHB
cvalentine@adhb.govt.nz
021 683 258

 

 

 

PicaSSo: Pilot for improving cognition after stroke study

Aim

The aim of this pilot study is to see whether people with stroke can improve their thinking skills with a computerised cognitive rehabilitation program.

Who

This study is for adults whose cognition is impaired after stroke.
Taking part starts within a week of the stroke.
People can take part if they have access to the internet with a computer or tablet at home.

What

People who take part will be randomly assigned to either computerised cognitive rehabilitation or usual care.
People in the computerised rehabilitation group will be given access to Rehacom (www.rehacom.com).
This programme is designed to train and improve attention, memory, visuo-spatial processing, and executive functions.
The programme involves 30 minutes of training, 5 times per week for 6 weeks.
People in the usual care group will receive standard rehabilitation therapy for their cognition.

Where

This study is based at North Shore Hospital.

Contact

Dr Susan Mahon, AUT University

smahon@aut.ac.nz

021 955 806

 

 

FASTER: Fatigue After Stroke Educational Recovery Programme

Aim

The aim of this study is to see whether we can reduce fatigue and improve quality of life after stroke.

Who

This study is for people aged at least 18 who experienced a stroke between 3 and 18 months ago and experience ongoing problems with fatigue.
People can take part if they have had one stroke of any kind, they live in the Auckland or Waikato regions, and they can hold a conversation in English.

What

The study involves attending one or more education sessions with 5-6 other people who have also had a stroke.

Where

Group sessions take place in local centres, such as hospitals and community centres.
Assessments take place at home or other suitable locations.

Contact

Dr Kelly Jones, Auckland University of Technology

faster@aut.ac.nz

021 246 0587

 

For information about Stroke Research in the Northern Region please contact:

A/Prof Cathy Stinear : c.stinear@auckland.ac.nz

Anna McRae: AnnaMcR@adhb.govt.nz

 
 
 
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